Welcome to the Forecast, Analysis, and Application (FAA) Lab.

Research interests in the FAA Lab includes not only the conventional areas of synoptic, mesoscale, and microscale meteorology, but also several interdisciplinary areas like aviation (or transportation) meteorology, space meteorology, and so on. Research areas in our laboratory include as follows.

  • Understanding the generation mechanisms of weather hazards like turbulence, icing, convection, low-level wind shear, gust, downslope windstorm, heavy snowfall (rainfall), and so on.
  • Classifications (characteristics) of weather hazards (Turbulence, Icing, and Convection).
  • Improvement of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) model for various applications.
  • Development of post-processing algorithms tailored to user demands.
  • Evaluations of NWP based forecasts against observation data like satellite, radar, lightning, in situ aircraft, and so on.
  • Two way interaction between the climate change and social/industrial activities (e.g., aviation).
  • Climate optimal (Green house gas missions and Contrail) flight trajectory modelings.


WE ARE LOOKING FOR research associates !

 If you are interested in weather forecast, analysis, and application, please contact to Prof. Jung-Hoon Kim who is currently looking for research associates in any levels (MS, PhD, or Postdoc). We are also looking for internship students (including undergraduate students) for these topics as well ! 


WE ARE PROVIDING REAL-TIME GLOBAL PROBABILISTIC TURBULENCE FORECAST !

- Real-time turbulence forecast is a global map and regional map for upper-level (cruising level) turbulence.
- Forecast fields are based on global ensemble forecast system (GEFS) provided by NOAA, and are updated every 6 hours.
- This system is based on the study by Prof. Kim [Kim et al. 2018; published in the Bulletin of American Meteorological Society (BAMS); Impact Factor = 8.166 in 2018].
- The system has been developed to provide probabilistic turbulence exceeding moderate-or-severe intensity of turbulence (Eddy Dissipation Rate larger than 0.2 m^2/3 s^-1) that is the International Aviation Civil Organization (ICAO) standard.

Contact information